Pushing through adversity

via Daily Prompt: Survive                                                                                                        “Forgiveness is actually gratitude for the gifts beneath the actions; they both set you free.” Kara – Soulstice Rising

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me, age 3 with my Norwegian grandmother

 

I woke up this morning thinking about my dad teaching me to ride my new bike when I was five years old.

I think about this often, as it has been one of my life lessons on using sheer determination, working past obstacles, and surviving in a world of pain.

“Don’t be a quitter” was one of his favorite sayings.

My new bike was  second hand with fat tires and a new paint job in green and cream enamel.  It was a small two wheel bike with no training wheels.

I was a healthy 5 year old with freckles on my nose, amber colored hair from being bleached in the sun, and a very strong will and a fighting spirit.

Dad must have thought that I needed some tough lessons to survive this life.

It was 1958, and I’m not sure if training wheels had been invented yet. ( Actually, it looks as though they were invented around 1950, but there was some controversy as to whether they actually helped.) I don’t think my dad would have thought them necessary anyway, as he was pretty much “old school”.

Regardless, I was to learn to peddle, balance, and steer with a single push off.

That’s how I was taught to ride my bike.

I don’t remember how many times I fell and skinned my knees, only to be told to get back on and try again.

As I held back the tears, I would get back on and keep trying until I learned to ride that darned bike.

One of the worst feelings I remember is skinning my knees again after just freshly skinning them on the rough cement pavement.

It burned a lot as the blood ran down my legs and I peddled furiously to learn this new skill.

The physical pain, the emotional pain of failure, all of these things worked against me.

But my dad kept making me get back on my bike until I learned to ride in my first session.

Harsh treatment for a child, you may think, and it was.

But many times in my life, this story has kept me going, and I survived it all .

In Buddhist teachings we are taught to thank our adversaries, forgive them, and understand that they have been placed in our lives to teach us.

Whenever I’ve been confronted with relationship or material loss, abusive relationships, dire uncertainty, or physical challenges, I’ve been able to keep my focus on my goals, keep my nose to the grindstone, and carry on regardless of what circumstances came my way.

It’s important not to let our lives be distracted by these obstacles that arise to throw us off our path.

We can work through the pain, by keeping a clear focus on our values, plans, and dreams.

Try not to give too much importance to the pain, the drama, the naysayers that rear their ugly heads.

Move beyond it.

Stay focused and firm in your authenticity

You can survive anything.

 

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pillow from Target

 

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Dear Ones,

As you go about your life, take time to choose wisely, navigate with care, and always give more than you receive.  The end result will be a life filled with much happiness, love, and peace.

Thanks for visiting today.  Please sign up so you don’t miss a post.

 

 

 

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About Lornahttps://cottagenecessities.wordpress.comHow many of us long for our own comfy cottage in the woods? I know I do! We can make our own comfy cottage, right here, right now, no matter where we live. I'm a mother of two, grandmother of two boys, interior designer who thinks out-of-the-box, up cycler, and interested in just about anything related to living comfortably and finding contentment, connecting with the Great Spirit in the natural world and respect for all beings who walk the earth.

8 thoughts on “Pushing through adversity

  1. “Stay focused and firm in your authenticity.” I’ve been so susceptible to the influence of others always telling me what to do, so worried about what they thought of me, never trusting my inner self… this is one of my current lessons, even at this later stage in my life. Learning to live in the moment is key to finding that authenticity. Thank you for being a shining light as I find my way, Lorna. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m happy to be here for you Ellen. Staying true to your authentic self is a life long journey. We experience it when we are young and as we grow older we find ways to cover it up to protect ourselves. So lifting the layers one by one is an aspect of our journey. The more you can get in touch with that pure essence of your being the more ease you will find in becoming who you truly are. The greatest gift you have right now is your recognition of this fact. That you are awesome!

      Like

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